How to use Bookmarks in Twitter

A few months ago, Twitter rolled out a new Bookmarks feature. It’s fantastic. I don’t know about you, but Twitter is where I’m getting most of my best research leads these days. Not just links, but nested threads by experts. It’s delightful, but hard to keep track of the gems. Bookmarks fixes this. The feature isn’t readily accessible on desktop yet, but there’s a work-around.

Setting a bookmark on mobile
1. Tap on the tweet to expand it.
2. At the bottom of the tweet, tap  , and choose Add Tweet to bookmarks.

Accessing bookmarks on mobile
1. Go to the Home screen.
2. Tap your user picture (upper left), and choose Bookmarks.

Desktop work-around
To set or access bookmarks on a desktop browser, you have to use the mobile version of the site. 

1. In the URL, insert an “m.” after the forward slashes (for example: https://m.twitter.com), then press Enter.
2. Now you’re looking at the mobile version of the site, and the instructions above will work, except that your user picture will be on the top left.

Snazzy, right? This function is my new favorite thing.

Historical Geography reading list

This is a list of books I’m likely to mention in today’s Archaeology and Anthropology panel.

Historical Geography is the study of how a place changes over time, with a focus on human economic and cultural interaction.

  • The Fields Beneath, The History of One London Village, by Gillian Tindall
  • The Man Who Drew London, Wenceslaus Hollar in Reality and Imagination, by Gillian Tindall
  • London, The Biography by Peter Ackroyd
  • The Discovery of France: A Historical Geography From The Revolution To First World War, by Graham Robb
  • Landmarks, by Robert MacFarlane (about dialect terms for very specific geography throughout the UK)
  • The Revenge of Geography, What the map tells us about coming conflicts and the battle against fate, by Robert D. Kaplan
  • Jerusalem, by Simon Sebag Montefiore
  • Palmento: A Sicilian Wine Odyssey, by Robert V. Camuto
  • Barcelona, by Robert Hughes
  • The Accidental City: Improvising New Orleans, by Lawrence N. Powell

Scholarly texts:

  • Late Victorian Holocausts: El Nino Famines and the Making of the Third World Economy, by Mike Davis
  • The Great Divergence: China, Europe and the Making of the Modern World Economy, Princeton University Press by Kenneth Pomerantz

Archaeology non-fiction:

  • Mesopotamia, The Invention of the City, by Gwendolyn Leick
  • Babylon: Mesopotamia and the Birth of Civilization, by Paul Kriwaczek
  • Britain Begins (very dry and factual) Barry Cunliffe